The History of Taylor Court Grocery

The Taylor Court Grocery at 1335 S. E. 80th Ave. is one of Portland, Oregon's last remaining streetcar era grocery stores in a residential setting. At the time it was built, the corner store was a fixture in every neighborhood. In 1921, the first year it appeared in the Polk City Directory, there were 855 retail grocery stores for a population of just 258,288.

When chain stores began to proliferate, most of the mom-and-pops went out of business, but Taylor Court Grocery's dedicated owners and employees ensured its survival. Nearly a century later it continues to thrive and serve as the hub of the Kinzel Park neighborhood.

This history of the Taylor Court Grocery is the story of those hard-working owners and employees who preserved this Montavilla icon. It was written specifically for Mel Hafsos and Errol Carlson to thank them for their many contributions to the neighborhood since they purchased the store in 1996. Their story is yet to be told.

The Selling of Lot 1 (1892-1903)

Before the first bridges went up across the Willamette River, most of Mt. Tabor's east side was made up of farmland and orchards. When the first bridge, the Morrison, was constructed in 1887 speculators began rapidly buying up this farmland for residential development.

One of the early farmers on Mt. Tabor was German immigrant August Kinzel who had arrived with his wife Katherine and their two small children Ida and Paul in 1871 or '72. The family principally grew 'small fruit' or berries.

Both Katherine and August died in middle-age and were buried in the Mt. Calvary Cemetery. After August's death in late 1886, 19-year-old Ida skillfully executed the estate. She sold the handful of farm animals, equipment, and household goods to pay the taxes and debts accrued from her father's illness, but was unable to unload the 'old white horse' which was 'of no value' and some kitchen utensils and a sewing machine 'at any cost.' These she gave to her brother.

Ida and Paul then split the real property consisting of the house valued at $1,000 and the 72 acres of Mt. Tabor land south of the base line road (Stark) valued at $3,800.

Ida appears to have taken the house and 17 ½ acres her father had purchased from William Crawford in 1882. The next year she married traveling salesman George Armstrong. She raised six children and later became a Portland public school teacher.

Although the estate was to be split equally, it appears that 18-year-old Paul inherited the entire 55 acre tract his father had purchased from Albert Bartsch on July 1, 1870.

While the estate was being settled, Ida rented the farm to Irish immigrants James and Annie Hyland who had come to Portland with their four children sometime prior to 1880. For at least a decade the Hylands lived in downtown Portland where James worked as a house carpenter.

In 1887 they moved to Mt. Tabor and operated a dairy farm on the Kinzel place. In a few years James decided to try his hand a land speculation and gave up farming to form the Enterprise Real Estate Co. with Daniel Bartholomew, Benjamin Childers, and M. Lanktree.

With no rent coming in from the farm, and probably having had his fill of berry-picking in his youth, Paul platted the 55 acres for development. He named the tract, which is bounded by SE 76th and 80th and SE Stark and Madison, Kinzel Park. He made his first sale in February 1892 to Archbishop Gross. The full-block lot held a church and the original monastery of the Sisters Adorers of Precious Blood at SE 76th and Main.


Greek Revival Monastery
built in 1892 at 7617 SE Main

The Greek Revival monastery seen above was completed in 1892, but demolished 30 years later to make way for the larger and more fire resistant Spanish Colonial monastery that exists today.

In 1892 Paul also sold a number of smaller lots to James and Annie Hyland. When the Panic of 1893 hit, Portland's real estate market began to founder. In 1894 Paul joined James in forming Kinzel and Hyland from the remnants of Enterprise.

At this time James was also the President of the Portland, Mount Tabor & Eastern Railroad Company which began operating in 1893 and ran almost the full length of Kinzel Park. It connected to the City and Suburban Railroad at 70th and Yamhill, ran 2½ miles southeast down Mt. Tabor, looped around Market and then up 80th to Morrison where it turned eastward and ended near 102nd and Stark.

The railroad ceased working in July 1894 because of engine failure, and the lessee, J. E. Howard, sued the company for $10,000 for failing to provide him with a new steam engine. The stock holders held that the engine was repairable and was Howard's responsibility. Some alleged that he was scheming with the directors, Pres. James Hyland and Sec. Father L. A. Brousseau, to buy back the property at a low cost and freeze them out. When the case came to trial the judge told the jury that there was no evidence of fraud by the directors, and Howard was awarded $50.

In the fall of '95 the $30,000 railroad, which was built by subscription from the property-owners along the route, was sold for $1,800 and the rails were dismantled and taken to a logging camp in Washington.

The Oregonian reported that 'a considerable amount of property was sold on the strength of the road, but the property owners would never receive any great advantage from it.'


Spanish Colonial Monastery
built in 1922 at 7617 SE Main

In 1896, Paul realized that Portland real estate was played out for the time being and left try his luck in the remote mines of Silver City, Idaho.

In 1898 the Hylands moved back to downtown Portland where James resumed work as a carpenter to support their growing family of eleven children. In the meantime they still owned a fair number of home lots on Mt. Tabor for which they'd paid $400, but could not sell for even $100. This included a lot in Kinzel Park on the corner of SE 80th and Taylor.

In 1900, the Hylands owed $3.65 in back taxes on four lots in Kinzel Park, so sold them to their oldest son William who worked for the City and Suburban Railroad. William also soon owed back taxes on these lots and sold them back to his parents for $1.00.

For 10 years, Lot 1, Block 13 at the corner of SE 80th and Taylor remained in the Hyland family. Then in the fall of 1902, James decided to rid himself of the land for good and sold it and an adjoining lot to real estate agent George Barringer.

On March 12, 1903, Barringer sold the eventual site of the Taylor Court Grocery to Fred and Rosannah Burdick for $100.

Rosannah and Fred Burdick (1903-1918)

Rosannah McKinney and Fred Burdick married in Portland in 1902 when she was 27, and he, 28. They had two children – Rose Bettie born in 1903 and William Til in 1905.

They had their home built on Lot 1, Block 13 in Kinzel Park sometime before 1906 when the city directory lists their address as 100 Kearney. That was the year Portland annexed Montavilla and began the first of several efforts to standardize addresses. 100 Kearney soon became 1998 E Taylor, then 2002 E Taylor, and finally 7934 SE Taylor in 1934.


Rosannah and Fred Burdick Home
built c. 1905 at 7934 SE Taylor

Fred Burdick was born in 1874 in Reynolds, Nebraska to Nelson and Marrilla (Marks) Burdick and had three siblings – Cora, Carrie, and E. E.

The Burdick family arrived in Portland on Christmas day in 1889. They first appeared in the Portland city directory of 1893. No address was given beyond Kinzel Park, but they were probably living at 7713 SE Morrison based on tax records published in the Oregonian. Nelson and his son E. E. were carpenters and likely built the home on Morrison as well as Fred and Rosannah's home on Taylor.

Fred's sister Cora was a beloved teacher in the Montavilla grade school and was active in the church and several lodges. When she died suddenly in 1899 at the age of 26, the entire community mourned.

In 1902 Fred's sister Carrie married Albert Farley, a clerk in W. C. Reed's tobacco shop. His brother E. E. married Mary Taylor a year later and for over a decade the two couples lived next door to each other – first at the corner of NE 77th and Hasslo and later in the 8100 block of Ankeny which is now the site of the Hong Phat Food Center at 101 SE 82nd.

Fred's wife Rosannah Sharpe McKinney was born in 1875 in Lawrence, Kansas to William and Flora (Wood) McKinney. She had four siblings – William, Margaret, George, and Jessie.

The McKinneys came to Portland in 1883 and first appeared in the city directory in 1885 where William was listed as selling fish and game at the corner on 4th and J. street (815 NW Naito Parkway). The family moved a number of times before eventually settling at 42 E. 6th at the corner of NE 6th and Davis where they boarded.

Most of the adult McKinney children continued to live with their parents while they worked. William was a marine engineer, Margaret a compositor (typesetter) for the Catholic Sentinel, Rosannah a reader for Press Clipping Bureau, George a candy maker, and Jessie a stenographer.

In the summer of 1900 Rosannah and her sister Margaret pooled their funds and opened a wholesale ice cream factory at 731 SW Yamhill and an ice cream, confectionery, and tobacco store at 737 SE Grand Ave. (original buildings no longer exists). They brought their brother George on board to help manage the businesses, but not long after Rosannah and Fred were married, the sisters took George to court after he mortgaged a portion of the property without their knowledge. Fearing that they would become indebted to creditors, they asked the judge to have their father take receivership, and they won their case.

When their father died soon afterward, the businesses were shut down and their mother opened a delicatessen, grocery, and confectionery at what was 424 SE Morrison with George and Margaret as her employees.

A few years later Flora and Margaret moved to Seattle to live with William. At the age of 72, Flora became a student at the University of Washington where she took classes in gardening and sociology. She also participated in many civic organizations including acting as vice president of the Mothers' Congress, the King County branch of the Western Washington Federation of Improvement Clubs, and the city organization of the Nation Council of Women Voters. She also was a member of the Parent-Teacher Association, and the Lakewood Social and Literary Club.

Because of her family's retail experience, it seemed possible that Rosannah may have had a store next to her home on Taylor, but after the birth of her first child in 1903, she gave up the ice cream business and followed in her mother's footsteps by becoming involved in civic affairs.

Fred and Rosannah lived at 7934 SE Taylor for twelve years. During that time Fred worked as a driver for the U.S. Laundry, the Crescent Laundry, and the East Portland Cleaning and Dye Works.

He was also a charter member of the fraternal organization Woodmen of the World, Lodge 77 and participated in local dog shows with his St. Bernard Madame Bruno and his bull terrier Highland Lady.

In his spare time Fred was also an inventor. One of his patents was for a device for cleaning windows that didn't require the use of a ladder. He gave demonstrations of the product in their home.

Rosannah cared for their children Rose and William and, for a time, was President of the Montavilla Parent Teacher Association and helped organize Portland's 1911 Child Welfare Exhibit. She was also Vice President of Pacific Circle 400 of Women of Woodcraft.

In the summers of 1915 and '16 Rosannah and her children took the new passenger train to the coast where they spent two months in a tent on Manhattan Beach in Rockaway. Fred joined them on the last week of their 1916 vacation, likely taking the 'Daddy Train' that arrived at the coast on Fridays.

In 1918, the Burdicks sold their home for $700 to Gilbert and Josie Abert, the first owners of the Taylor Court Grocery.

The Burdicks then moved to a large piece of property in Lents and, soon after, to Sandy. In 1925 they relocated to Seattle perhaps to be nearer their daughter Rose who'd married C. Elliot Pickrell, owner of Pickrell's Price Right Grocery.

Fred continued to work as a laundry driver, and in 1928 he and Rosannah separated. She returned to Portland to live with her son, William, who was a concessionaire.

Rosannah worked as a newspaper saleswoman and a clerk for several years. She died in 1943 at age 68 and was buried in Lincoln Memorial Park.

Fred retired in 1945 and died two years later at the age of 72. He was buried in Lone Fir Cemetery with the rest of the Burdick family.

Josie and Gilbert Abert (1918-1927)

Gilbert Jacques Abert, the oldest child of Gilbert and Rosanna (Burns) Abert, was born in 1860 in St-Jacques-le-Mineur, Quebec. He had one younger sibling, Sophia.

Gilbert's wife Josephine B. Josie Desormeau was born in 1864 in Quebec to Eusebe and Delima (St. Piere) Desormeau. She had eleven siblings – Joseph, Cicerine, Eliza, Ceasor, Henry, Caroline, David, Adolphus, John, Aurelia, and Regina.

Gilbert was just a baby when his family immigrated to the United States. Josie's family came when she was 16. Both families settled on farms in Alpena County, Michigan on the shores of Lake Huron. Gilbert and Josie grew up in French speaking homes, but attended school through the fifth grade where they learned to speak English.

Gilbert was 24 and Josie 20 when they married in 1884. Their oldest child Nora Delano Abert was born in Alpena Co. in 1885.

The young couple lived and worked on the Abert family farm until 1889 when they moved into the town of Alpena where Gilbert was a general laborer.

Sometime before May 9, 1891, Josie and Gilbert moved south to Saginaw, Michigan because their second child Amies Alphonse Abert was born there on that day.

In 1895 the family moved to Duluth, Minnesota where Gilbert worked as a laborer in the Mitchell & McClure lumber mill. By the turn of the century they were back in Buena Vista, Saginaw Co., Michigan where they purchased their first home.

In 1904 the Aberts moved across the country to Portland. Why they chose to settle in this city and Kinzel Park, in particular, is unknown, but a clue might be in their daughter's middle name. There was a large family of Delanos living in Portland at that time including Truman Delano, a distant cousin of FDR, who built the historic Stick Style house at 7733 SE Alder. If there was a family connection to the Delanos, it was likely through Rosanna whose family came from New York.

In 1906 the Portland city directory shows Gilbert employed by the Pacific Railway Company and living in Kinzel Park at 112 Kearney St., now 7916 SE Taylor.

On November 30, 1907 their 22-year-old daughter Nora married neighbor Seth Nickolous Lind [Lindstrom].

Seth had arrived in Portland the year before the Aberts and was working for the Pacific Lumber Company. He was the brother of Oscar, Anton, Konrad, and Signe (Lindstrom) Nordlof - all immigrants from Umea, Sweden and residents of Kinzel Park.

All of the Lindstrom brothers worked in the carpentry and construction trades. In 1915 Oscar founded the Lindstrom Bros. general construction company. Three years later he also founded Lindstrom & Feigenson which specialized in concrete bridge construction all over the Pacific Northwest.


Nanny and Oscar Lindstrom Home
built in 1905 at 7937 SE Salmon

In 1909 Seth and Nora were living in a bungalow at 7804 SE Madison likely built by the Lindstrom brothers because of its unusually thick and decorative concrete foundation. The empty adjoining lot to the east was in Nora’s name having been deeded to her by Seth just days after their wedding.

That year a notice in the Oregonian stated that Seth was building an even larger $2,500 home at the corner of 80th and Morrison, likely 7932 SE Morrison St. based on historic permits naming Seth as the owner in 1919.

Sometime before April 21, 1910 the Aberts moved into a new home at 7904 SE Taylor also probably built by the Lindstrom brothers. At the end of July 1910, they sold their old home at 7915 SE Taylor to Peter Newburg for $800.

At the time of the 1910 census, the Linds were living the Aberts. Nora was pregnant and gave birth to their daughter, Claire Sophia Lind, on November 29, 1910 before she and Seth moved into their new home on Morrison.

By 1915 Seth and Nora had again moved back in with the Aberts while he constructed a home at 8005 SE Taylor St. An article in the Oregonian said plans called for a $1,500 cottage, but the home became a grander version of their previous bungalows perhaps because they had tired of moving and wanted to settle.


Nora and Seth Lind Home
built in 1915 at 8005 SE Taylor

On August 18, 1917 the Abert’s son Amies, 26, married Lida L. Lee, 33, in Chehalis, Washington.

In late April 1918 they bought lot 32, block 9 in the Hawthorne Ave. Addition for $425. Three months later Amies took out a building permit for a $1,000 bungalow listing himself as the contractor. Their home at 1532 SE 48th Ave. shows Seth's signature left-sided dormer, so he likely had help from his brother-in-law. Amies and Lida remained in this home for the rest of their lives.

A year after they built the house, Aimes took out a permit to build a garage and then bought a 1912 Willys Overland roadster. For a few years he had a chauffeur's license and registered a number of cars including a 1918 Flanders touring car, a 1916 Chevy touring car, a 1918 Chevy touring car, and a 1917 Maxwell sedan. Amies and Lida were industrious. Over the years he worked as a teamster, ship worker, grocery deliverer, chauffeur, truck driver, and painter. She was a 'janitress,' telephone operator, apartment manager, and practical nurse. They had no children, but at the time they married she had a 13-year-old son Vincent Hoffner.

Finally finding themselves empty-nesters, on June 14, 1918, Josie and Gilbert bought a smaller home at 7934 SE Taylor for $700 from Fred and Rosanna Burdick.


Anna and Anton Lindstrom Home
built in 1906 at 7936 SE Salmon

The Aberts now joined the Lindstrom homes that lined SE 80th Ave. Seth and Nora were just to the northeast on the corner of Taylor. Oscar and Anton were in large homes behind the Aberts on Salmon, and Signe (Lindstrom) Nordlof and her husband Yngve were in a small bungalow on Main.

A couple of years later, the youngest brother Konrad Lindstrom and his wife Tekla would immigrate and move into a home built for them by Anton at 8027 SE Taylor.

Not long after the Aberts bought their home, Gilbert took out a building permit to add a bathroom. His son-in-law Seth hired subcontractors for plumbing work and Gilbert was probably wishing he'd done the same. Historic permits show that he failed the city inspection rather spectacularly.

The 1920 census, taken January 10th shows Josie, 56, working from home as a dressmaker and Gilbert, 60, doing day labor.

Perhaps desiring more stable and less physically demanding work for Gilbert, the Abert's had a small grocery store constructed behind their home at 1135 SE 80th Ave. probably that same year.


Grocery Behind 7934 SE Taylor
built in 1920 at 1135 SE 80th

The store first appears in the city directory in 1921 joining over 800 other Portland neighborhood grocery stores. This was a prime location being just one block south of the Mt. Tabor street car line on Yamhill, and between the grocery stores located five blocks north on the Base Line (Stark) and 13 blocks south on the Section Line (Division).

The Aberts contentment with their new home and store must have been shattered when they first lost a grandson to stillbirth in the spring of 1921, and then their daughter Nora to an undisclosed illness just eight months later.

In the spring of 1924, Seth married a recently widowed neighbor Hildur Mathilda (Johnson) Ehn. She brought one child to the marriage, her three-year-old son Stanley Ehn.

Earlier in the year Seth had been inducted as a charter member into Oregon’s Guild of Building Handicrafts. He was one of just 23 artisans chosen for this honor.


Tekla and Konrad Lindstrom Home
built in 1921 at 8027 SE Taylor

Gilbert and Josie remained in Kinzel Park until 1927 when they had a new store built 'out on the Section Line' at 8431 Division. There may have been a small house at the back of this building at one time because the Aberts gave this as their residential address in all subsequent city directories and census records.

The family suffered another loss when, on Mar 8, 1937, Josie and Gilbert’s only remaining child Aimes died suddenly at the age of 45. Ten years later, to the day, his wife Lida was killed when struck by a driver while crossing Hawthorne Blvd.

Josie continued to work as dressmaker and Gilbert as a grocer for many years until the 1940 census finds them retired at their Division street address at the ages of 75 and 80.

Josie died in 1950 and Gilbert the following year. They were buried in the Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery.

The Aberts left behind numerous nieces and nephews, their son-in-law Seth, and granddaughter Claire Sophia Lind who had married Harry C. Maybee, a car salesman. Claire and Harry had no children, and Claire died a few years after her grandparents at the age of 45.

Seth continued to work as a carpenter and, in his later years, was a maintenance man at Rocky Butte. He remained socially active as a member of the Washington Lodge No. 46, Al Kader Shrine, Scandia Lodge, Harmony Lodge No. 472, Runeberg Lodge No. 125, and Carpenters Local No. 226.

He died in 1960 at age the age of 76. He was survived by his second wife Hildur, step-son Stanley Ehn, sister Signe Nordloff, and a brother and sister who had remained in Sweden. He was interred at the Lincoln Memorial Park mausoleum.


Emmy and Carl Anderson (1927-1942)

Emmy Maria Johansson-Lindborg was born in 1900 in Farghult, Smoland, Sweden, the seventh child of Johan and Ida (Eriksdotter) Johansson. The Johanssons had ten children – Karl, Hulda, Augusta, Axel, August, Anna, Emmy, Hjalmar, Alva, and Marta. All but one of the children emigrated to the United States.

Emmy arrived in New York City on the SS Drottningholm in 1922 with her younger sisters Alva and Marta. She first lived in Everett, Washington and then soon moved to Seattle.

In 1924 she a maid at 1704 Boylston Ave., a mansion in the Capitol Hill neighborhood belonging to the Nelson family of the Frederick & Nelson department stores who advertised regularly for a 'competent Swedish girl for general housework.'

In 1926 she was a 'domestic' at 601 36th Ave N. in the Broadmoore neighborhood. This was the home of Ceneth Ross, widow of Charles Ross, Director of the Seaboard National Bank and President of the Miner's and Merchant's Bank.

On March 21, 1927 Emmy wed Carl A. Anderson who was also a Swedish immigrant. Their marriage in Seattle was witnessed by her sister and brother-in-law Marta and Herman Hokanson.

Carl was born Karl Abel Andersson in 1897 in Umea, Västerbotten, Sweden. He was the oldest of 13 children born to Anton and Selma (Hanson) Andersson – Karl, Rebecka, Johan, Per Birger, Anna, Ernst, Rakel, Anton, Gunborg, Dagny, Per Sigvard, Milda, and Alma.

Swedish church records show that on January 1, 1917, Karl Abel Andersson, a bondeson (son of a farmer or peasant), departed Västerbotten alone for NordAmerika.

Where Carl first landed after his transatlantic voyage is unclear, but it appears that a bungalow at 2419 Aberdeen Ave. in Hoquiam, Washington served as the family's home base.

In 1917 Carl's brother John was working in a Polson Log Company camp and gave Charles Andersson at 2419 Aberdeen Ave. as his closest relative.

During the 1920 census, Carl was enumerated as a lumber mill stacker boarding in the home of Olav and Martha Hanson in Hoquiam. Two years later John listed Carl at 2419 Aberdeen Ave. as his contact on a return visit from Sweden.

Because Carl alternately used the names Carl, Abel, and Andrew his whereabouts between 1922 and '25 were difficult to trace, but in 1926 and '27 he appears in the Seattle directory as barber C.A. Anderson at 110 ½ 2nd Ave S.

On March 21, 1927, he married Emmy and they soon moved to Portland. In April plumber F. G. Yungeberg pulled a permit for the store at 1135 SE 80th which may have been for a sink for Carl's barbering.

Carl and Emmy first appeared in the Portland city directory in 1928 as Carl and Emmy Anderson at 7934 SE Taylor and C.A. Anderson, barber and grocer at 1135 SE 80th. The 1929 directory shows Emmy managing the store while Carl barbered.

When the 1930 census was taken, Carl and Emmy were both working in the store. He was a retail grocery merchant and she a grocery clerk. Emmy had submitted her papers to become a naturalized citizen, but Carl had not. They spoke both English and Swedish and had attended school through the 8th grade. They owned their home valued at $1,800 and, according to state records, had recently purchased their first car, a 1923 Chevy Coupe.

City directories for the next few years show that Carl had given up barbering, probably because the building was just too small to accommodate both businesses.

Then in 1934 he was listed as a grocer at 1135 SE 80th and a barber at 1137 SE 80th. So he and Emmy must have had an addition constructed on the south side of the building for a barbershop in '33. In 1931 they registered a new Buick with the state, so probably had the garage added onto the west side at the same time.

In 1935 the store was listed in a full-page Oregonian ad along with other stores that carried Kellogg's brand new cereal Wheat Krispies. It was simply called Anderson's Grocery.

Little seems to have changed for the Andersons over the next six years. The 1940 census shows that they were still working together in the store. Carl was the 'proprietor' of a retail grocery store, and Emmy had been promoted to the title of 'partner.' Carl had worked 60 hours the previous week to Emmy's 30, and they'd both worked a full 52 weeks the previous year. They declined to state their earnings, but did note that they had income from other sources as well. Their home was now valued at $2,500, and Carl had yet to become a U.S. citizen.

In 1941 he filed naturalization papers, but his application was rejected because he lacked a valid certificate of arrival. His brother John was able to claim his citizenship based on the papers from his return trip from his visit to Sweden in 1922.

How Carl and John first made it into the country prior to 1920 is unknown. A thorough search of Canadian and U.S. ship's manifests turned up nothing, and Carl would never again apply for citizenship.

The last record of Carl and Emmy in Portland was Carl's WWII Draft Card that he completed in the spring of 1942. He was described as 5'6”, 140 lbs, with blue eyes and brown hair. Emmy's description in her naturalization records was identical with the exception of her blonde hair.

Later that year, the Andersons sold their property to Grace and Hugh Schull and moved to Similk Beach on Fidalgo Island in Washington, and Carl went to work for the Anacortes Veneer.

The company was a worker-owned plywood mill that had started production just a few years before their move. Carl and Emmy may have been early investors because a 'C. A. Anderson' was listed among the original 1939 shareholders.

Many of Emmy and Carl's siblings lived in the Seattle area including Carl's brother John and his sister and brother-in-law, Gunborg and Bror Edfelt, who were all shareholders in PenPly, another worker-owned plywood company.

Information about the Andersons after 1942 is scant, but they do receive a few mentions in the Port Angeles Evening News because they had a number of relatives living there. On July 20, 1956, they were leaving town after having spent a few days with Carl's sister and brother-in Gunborg and Bror Edfelt.

On Christmas Day 1959 they were guests at the home of Carl's sister and brother-in-law, Rakel and Sig Halvorson. His sister Catherine and her husband, Ingvald Grevstad, were also present for the festivities.

On September 17, 1968 Carl was an honorary pallbearer at the funeral of his brother-in-law, Bror.

On Valentine's Day 1970, Emmy and Carl attended a family wedding.

Carl died on May 19, 1970 in Mount Vernon at the of 73 and was buried in the Hawthorne Memorial Cemetery. After his death, Emmy moved to Mount Vernon which was about 10 miles to the east of their home near Anacortes. She enjoyed raising flowers and gardening and attended Mount Vernon's Salem Lutheran Church and Vasa Lodge.

Emmy died April 1, 1992 at the age of 92 and was buried in the Hawthorne Memorial Cemetery. She was survived by her younger sisters Alva and Marta and many nieces and nephews.

Grace and Hugh Shull (1942-1945)

Hugh Madison Shull was the youngest child of James Madison and Susan (Suter) Shull. His older siblings were Joseph, Edgar, Capitola, and Benjamin. Hugh's parents had met in Mercer County, Illinois and married in 1861. His father then enlisted with the Illinois 102nd Infantry and served as a corporal until the end of the Civil War.

Sometime after their second child was born in 1869, the Shulls moved to a farm in Newton County, Missouri. After a few years, they pushed further west settling in Eagle Creek in Clackamas County where Hugh was born in 1875.

At the time of the 1880 census, Hugh and his siblings were in the household of his Suter grandparents in Eagle Creek, but their parents were not enumerated. What became of their mother is a mystery, but five years later the children were living with their father in Walla Walla, Washington where they spent most of their childhood.

On October 14, 1897 Hugh married Grace G. Kite in a double wedding with his brother and her sister – Benjamin Shull and Clara Bell Kite. The ceremony was in the sisters' home in unincorporated Johnson, Washington near Pullman.

Grace Kite was born in 1879 in Whitman County, Washington Territory. She and Clara were the two oldest of ten children born to George and Jennie Kite who were farmers and, later, grocers in Johnson. George and Jennie had married in Lee Co., Iowa in 1873 and came west soon afterwards.

In an Oregonian interview celebrating the Shulls 60th anniversary, Hugh claimed that the liked all six of Grace’s sisters – Clara, Josephine, Minerva, Georgia, Edna, Isadora – but that Grace 'went after him a little harder than the other girls.' She said that 'he was quite a man in his day – could beat them all in the 100 yard dash.'

After they were married, Grace and Hugh lived with her grandmother Minerva Taylor in Johnson while he worked as a farm laborer. Two sons were born there, Edwin 'Ted' in 1898 and Walter in 1900. Walter died as an infant and was buried in the Whitman County cemetery.

Shortly after Walter’s death, Grace and Hugh moved to Sherman Co. in north central Oregon which is bounded by the John Day, Deschutes, and Columbia rivers. The family settled in the small town of Moro where they had two more children – Velma in 1901 and Doris in 1911.

As soon as they arrived in Sherman Co. they began buying up land and growing wheat. By 1917 their farm was worth $43,910 - the second highest valuation in the county. They farmed there for 35 years, and in Gilliam County, to the east, for six years. At one time Hugh was said to hold the world's record on a steam stock thresher – threshing an average of 1250 sacks of wheat a day over a six-year period.

Grace and Hugh both had family in the Portland area and began wintering there in the ‘20s. In 1920 they bought a three bedroom bungalow at SE 4523 Ave. in the Foster-Powell neighborhood. When wheat prices peaked in 1924, they traded it for a stylish five bedroom bungalow at 3591 SE Lincoln St. in the Richmond neighborhood.

In 1924 their middle child Velma married Herman Parsons, a life insurance salesman from California, and moved to Chico.

As wheat prices began to fall, the Shulls sold their home and rented for the winter. In 1927 they lived at what now is the site of a large condo complex in the 3400 block of SE Hawthorne while Grace worked as a clerk for the Millionaire Club Restaurant downtown.

In 1928 they lived at 429 E. Morrison which was likely the McKinley Hotel apartment building which still stands at the corner of SE 7th and Morrison.

Their youngest, Doris, married logger Andrew Young on December 26, 1929 in Chenowith, Skamania, Washington. This was probably where Shulls spent the winter of '29 because the 1930 census, taken in early April, shows Hugh and Grace living in a boarding house in that town. Grace was the boarding house cook, and Hugh was waiting on his crop of winter wheat.

Grace and Hugh remained on their wheat farm in Moro throughout the 1930s and into the early '40s according to city directories and census records.

In 1942 they retired to Portland and bought the home and store at 7934 SE Taylor and 1135 SE 80th. Grace's parents having been grocers may have been their impetus for going into the business.

Their son Ted, who had worked as a farm hand around Oregon and Washington throughout most of his youth, must have followed them because he enlisted in the army in Portland in December of that year.

On October 6, 1944 the Shulls placed this ad in the Oregonian:

NICELY furn., well-lighted room for barber shop or beauty parlor. Come and see it. 1135 SE 80th SU 9026.

This is the last mention of the barbershop. It still existed as late as 1950 according to Sanborn maps, but the store was eventually expanded into the space probably in 1953 when it officially became the Taylor Court Grocery.

A later Oregonian article, rife with typos, stated that the Shulls also owned a store at SE 36th and Raymond which would have been near Reed College. No Portland city directories were published from 1943 to 1949, but a search of directories before and after these dates show no store at this location. There were, however, groceries at both 6401 and 7730 SE Raymond.

In 1945 the Shulls gave up the grocery business after Doris moved to Portland with her three small children following the death of her husband in a logging accident.

Grace and Hugh moved to a new home at 3816 N. Massachusetts in the Overlook neighborhood. The next year they they celebrated their 50th anniversary there with an open house that included their children – Doris, Velma, and Ted, and their three grandchildren.

In October of 1956 they had another open house for their 60th anniversary at their home at 3736 SE 27th in the Creston-Kenilworth. The celebration included their three children, four grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

When asked by the Oregonian reporter why they’d lived such a long happy life, Grace responded that maybe it was because they’d 'moved around so much.'

Hugh and Grace made one last move to John Day, Oregon to be near Doris who had remarried and was managing a hotel in Dayville.

Hugh died in John Day in 1960 at the age of 84, and Grace in 1965 at 85. They were buried in the Rose City Cemetery in Portland.

Florence and William Carpenter (1948-1955)

William Albert Carpenter was born in 1889 in Seymour, Jackson, Indiana to farmers Allen and Fannie (Selfridge) Carpenter. His parents had both been widowed before marrying, so William inherited a large extended family with 12 older half-siblings including his sister 'Queen Victoria' Carpenter. His two full siblings were his sister Goldie and brother Bonnie.

William was eleven when his family moved into Jackson where his father was employed by the Southern Indiana railroad. In 1905 his father died suddenly of pneumonia and the family moved to Indianapolis where his mother had a rooming house.

His sister Goldie married Errett Carden in 1908 and they bought a house in Indianapolis where they lived for the rest of their lives. Two years later the census shows William and Bonnie still living in their mother's boarding house. William, 21, was working as a brakeman for the railroad and Bonnie, 18, was an errand boy for a chair factory.

In 1914 William married 19-year-old telephone operator Dorothea Clark. The marriage was short-lived because by 1917 he was single and employed as a chauffeur by Williams Auto Co. according to his WWI draft records. His card described him as 5' 10” with a medium build, fair skin, blue eyes, and brown hair.

A 1973 fire destroyed 80 percent of WWI service records, but surviving records show that later that year he was drafted into the 159th Depot Brigade at Camp Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. Depot brigades supplied troops for the infantry, engineer, and artillery regiments. He was honorably discharged from Camp Taylor on May 18, 1919.

In 1920 William and Bonnie, who was also a WWI veteran, were living in Indianapolis with their half-sister Lizzie. William, 30, was a truck driver for an oil company, and Bonnie, 27, a driver for a paper company.

Later that year William married 32-year-old Jerre 'Margueritte' St. Clair and they headed west. In 1922 they were living in Alhambra, Los Angeles, California where he was an auto mechanic. Three years later he was a grocer at 123 W. Garvey. This was another short marriage for William. He and Margueritte divorced in 1926 or '27.

In early 1928 he was admitted to the Sawtelle Veterans Home in Los Angeles County for observation of a 'gastric crisis.' This was where he met his third wife, 32-year-old Florence Schofield, who was a waitress in the home. They were married later that year, and moved in with her mother who lived in Maywood.

Florence was born in 1896 in Bastard, Ontario, Canada (now Rideau Lakes) to John W. and Jennie Rae (Mead) Schofield. She had two sisters, Hazel and Mabel. After her father's death in 1913 her mother married widower Archibald Stevens.

Mabel, Florence, and Jennie all came to the U.S. around 1920. In that year Mabel was married and living in Chicago while Florence was in Denver working as toiletries demonstrator. Jennie, who was a dual citizen, appears in the L.A. city directory in 1921 without her husband who had remained in Canada.

At the time of the 1930 census William and Florence were still living with Jennie in Maywood. William had become a car salesman and Florence was head waitress in the veterans home.

By 1940 they'd moved to Bell City and were living in their own home at 4140 Florence Ave. William was still selling cars and supporting Florence and her mother.

In 1943 Florence, 46, enlisted as a private with the Women's Army Corps. She was described as a domestic cook who was 5 ft. tall and 106 lbs. Members of the WAC were the first women, other than nurses, to serve within the ranks of the United States Army. No further records of her service could be found, but her previous experience at the veterans home undoubtedly served her well.

In 1945 the trio moved to Portland probably to be near the rest of the family. Florence's sister Hazel had married Sherman Dunning in Moose Jaw, Canada in 1914, and they had come to Portland in 1928. Her younger sister Mabel had married Francis Sneyd in Chicago in 1919, and they had traveled around the country before settling in Portland in 1935.

No Portland directories were published from 1945-1949, but the 1950 directory shows William and Florence living at 7934 SE Taylor and working in the grocery at 1135 SE 80th owned by Gus and Lorena Whitehead.

Historic permits show that William replaced the heating systems in the home and store in the late summer and early fall of 1949 suggesting that they'd spent at least one year on the property.

In 1953 the Taylor Court Grocery makes its first official appearance in the city directory with Lorena Whitehead as its proprietor. Because the Whitehead's already owned another store called the Whitehead Grocery, they probably wanted to distinguish between the two stores.

The Carpenters were still at 7934 SE Taylor in 1953, but the directory does not give William's occupation. He may have been home caring for Florence who was suffering from a long illness. She died in late December of that year at the age of 57. She was survived by her mother, husband, sisters, and a nephew and was interred in the Portland Memorial Mausoleum.

After Florence's death, William went back to work in the 'Carpenter Grocery' (aka Taylor Court Grocery). Then in 1956 he returned to Indianapolis probably to be near his sister Goldie who had lost her husband, also a WWI vet, the previous year. Their brother Bonnie had also died in 1955 in the desert outside of Tuscon, Arizona.

William and Goldie had 10 years together before her death in 1967. He died in 1969 at the Barton House nursing home at age 79. He was survived by his two sisters-in-law and many half-nieces and nephews.

His body was returned to Portland and he was interred in the Portland Memorial Mausoleum next to Florence and her mother Jennie.

Lorena and Gus Whitehead (1945-1963)

Gus Edward Whitehead was born on New Year's Day 1901 in Johnson City, Tennessee. He was the oldest of Caddie and Ruth (Lyon) Whitehead's ten children. His younger siblings were Daisy, Milburn, Martha, Samuel, Sherman, George, Frank, Anona, and Raymond.

When Gus was 12 his parents left his paternal grandparent's farm in Tennessee and came west to Barton, Oregon where his dad took up logging. Gus left home at 18 and was living at 252 E. 39th (site of the Fred Meyer parking lot on Hawthorne) where he'd registered a 1913 Ford bus, possibly a delivery van. A year later he was back in Barton working as a donkey steam engineer in a logging camp.

In early 1921 he met Laurens 'Lorena' Pedersen, the daughter of Danish immigrants Jens and Lena (Jensen) Pedersen who had recently moved from Minnesota. Lena had been born in Meadow, Iowa in 1900 and had three siblings, Noah, Adeline, and Eleanor.

Lorena and Gus were married in Clackamas County on June 15, 1921 and their first child, Lawrence Dean Whitehead, was born in Barton in December of that year.

The couple moved a great deal over the next couple of decades which can be traced through Gus's numerous vehicle registrations with the state.

They were still in Clackamas Co. in 1923 when Gus traded in his 1913 Ford bus for a '21 Ford touring car.

In January 1924 he upgraded to a '23 Ford touring car and, just two months later, registered a brand new Standard sportster in Bridal Veil.

For the birth of their second son, Gus Edward 'Ed' Whitehead, Jr. on February 11, 1926, the family was back in Barton. They remained there as late as April 1929 when Gus registered a '28 Overland sedan.

The 1930 census finds the family in Bridal Veil once again. Gus was working as a locomotive engineer on a logging railroad, and they were renting a home on Palmer Road for $12 a month.

From 1931 through 1933 the family was briefly back in Barton where Gus registered a 1929 Willys Whippet.

The family had returned to Bridal Veil in 1935, but at the time of the 1940 census they were renting a large bungalow at 1028 Cascade St. in Hood River. Gus was an engineer in a wine distillery and Lorena had found seasonal work in a cannery. Their oldest son Lawrence, 18, was working in a sawmill.

Sometime before the fall of 1942 the family joined the war effort by moving to the shipyards of Newport News, Virginia where Lorena's older brother Noah had resided since the late '20s.

Ed, 16, appears in a 1942 yearbook for Morrison High School and the entire family is listed in the Newport News city directory of 1943. They were living at 87 Main Street in a large colonial style home in Hilton Village, a planned English village style neighborhood which had been built for the employees of the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company during WWI. Gus, Lawrence, and Ed were working for the company as an engineer, coppersmith, and apprentice, respectively.

On April 6, 1944 Lawrence, 22, enlisted in the Navy serving on the USS Menifee a Haskell-class attack transport assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Lawrence first served as a Fireman Water Tender, 1st Class maintaining the ship's boiler system and later as a Mechanic's Mate, 2nd Class maintaining the ship's engines.

The USS Menifee participated in the Battle of Okinawa Gunto from April 1-5, 1945. Lawrence was discharged on April 6, 1946.

A week after Lawrence enlisted, so did his younger brother Ed, who has just turned 17. He served on the minesweeper the USS Turkey, the refueling tanker the USS Camel, and the submarine chaser the USS SC 521. He reached the rank of Soundman (sonar technician) 2nd Class.

At the end of the war, the family returned to Oregon and purchased the house and store at 7934 SE Taylor and 1135 SE 80th. Before she married, Lorena had worked as a sales lady in a dry goods store in Knife Lake, Minnesota, so had some retail experience.

In 1946 Gus and Lawrence registered a '37 Plymouth and a '41 Pontiac using the store as their address of record.

Later that year Lawrence married Alladine Crawford, a photographer who had been living in Long Beach. His mom's signature appears on their marriage certificate as their witness.

Lawrence and Alladine had their first child, Shirley, on February 4, 1947. The birth announcement in the Oregonian cited 1135 SE 80th as their address, so the whole family was probably still living in the home on Taylor.

One Valentine's Day 1948 in Skamania, Washington, Ed married Maxine Call who was a senior at Portland's all-girl polytechnic high school. Lawrence and Alladine served as their witnesses.

With their sons married and out of the house, it was probably in 1948 that Gus and Lorena moved and hired William and Florence Carpenter to run the store.

It was also probably in 1948 that they bought their second store Whitehead Grocery at 4500 SE 122nd. That address no longer exists, but the store undoubtedly sat on the site of the Plaid Pantry on the corner of 122nd and Holgate.

The 1953 city directory shows that Gus managed the Whitehead Grocery and Lorena, the Taylor Court Grocery. Where they lived is unclear because they gave the Whitehead Grocery as their home address as they had previously with their other store.

Their sons had stayed in the old neighborhood. Lawrence and Alladine were living at 8054 SE Taylor with their daughters Shirley and Patricia. He was a machinist for the Hydraulic Power Equipment Co.

Ed and Maxine were at 7726 SE Stephens with their two children Sam and Cindy, and he was working as a chauffeur.

The directories between 1953 and 1958 are incomplete, but it appears that Gus and Lorena sold Whitehead Grocery in 1956 and moved back into 7934 SE Taylor after William Carpenter returned to Indiana. According to the 1956 directory, they managed Taylor Court Grocery together.

Two small articles about the store appeared in the Oregonian in 1956. First, on September 30th:

Thieves Visit Grocery

Thieves escaped with $20 in cash and a quantity of beer and cigarettes from the Whitehead grocery, 1135 S.E. 80th avenue police were told Saturday.

And two days later on October 2nd:

Burglar Thwarted

A 17-year-old boy was arrested on a burglary charge early Sunday when the owner of a grocery store caught him coming out of the store. Gus. E. Whitehead, 1135 S.E. 80th ave, told police he saw the boy enter the store, also at 1135 S.E. 80th. Whitehead waited at the back door until the boy came out, then seized him.

In 1958 Lawrence was still employed by the Hydraulic Power Equipment Co., but the family had moved to 11425 SE Home Ave. Ed was in the same home on Stephens and was a driver for the Howard Williams Co. In 1955 he and Maxine had their third and last child, Cheryl.

In 1960 Lorena and Gus bought the former Oscar and Nanny Lindstrom home at 7937 SE Salmon just across the alley from the store.

On September 12, 1963 they sold three properties in Kinzel Park to Ann Sudar. The Multnomah County Deed Index films are difficult to read, but the store must have been among these properties.

The following March, Gus died of a heart attack at the age of 63. His obituary mentioned that he grew up in Barton, owned the Taylor Court Grocery for nearly 20 years, and was a member of the Oregon City Baptist Church. He was survived by Lorena, his two sons, his father, four brothers, two sisters and five grandchildren.

Lorena remained in Portland where she died over three decades later on January 4, 1997 at the age of 96. Her obituary stated that she had owned the Taylor Court Grocery, other Portland grocery stores, and the Evergreen Restaurant in Gresham which she must have purchased and managed after Gus's death. Lorena was survived by her sons, one sister, five grandchildren, eight great grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild. She and Gus were buried in the Finley-Sunset Hills Memorial Park cemetery in Portland.

Over the years Lawrence worked his way up the ladder at the Hydraulic and Air Equipment Co. and by the 1970s he and Alladine had moved to Medford where he became the Medford division manager and vice president and eventually served on the board of directors. He and Alladine died in the '90s and are buried in the Hillcrest Memorial Park in Medford.

Ed and Maxine retired to Pacific City and died in the late aughts. They were buried with military honors in the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

Ann and Frank Sudar (1963-1996)

Franc 'Frank' Sudar was born in 1897 in Smiljan, Croatia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. His parents were Paul and Maria Sudar and he had at least three siblings – Kata, Theresa, and Jure 'Jerry.'

In August of 1912, at the age of 14, he boarded the steamship Rochambeau at Le Havre, France and paid his own passage to New York City. He was bound for Bearcreek, Montana, a new mining town near Billings, where his uncles Joseph, Jacob, and Jerry ran the Sudar Bros. grocery.

The ship's manifest shows that he traveled with his 17-year-old brother, Jerry, as well as his 20-year-old aunt Rosa and his uncle Mike's wife Omma 'Anna' then 26.

Frank was just 16 when he appeared in a 1913 Carbon County directory as a miner for the Montana Cole & Iron Co. Three years later he's listed in the city directory of Anaconda, Montana as laborer rooming at 421 Chestnut St. Anaconda was noted for at one time having the nation's first socialist mayor west of the Mississippi and the world's tallest masonry structure, the 585 ft Anaconda Smelter Stack.

In 1917 Frank was back in Carbon Co. working as a driver for the Bear Creek Coal Co. By this time Bearcreek employed 1,200 men, mostly immigrants, who mined coal for the railroads and the Anaconda company.

A year later Frank's WWI draft card describes him as tall and stout with blue eyes and brown hair. He was a clerk in his uncle Joseph's store, the prosperous Bearcreek Trading Co. Joseph had managed to accumulate a fair amount of real estate in the town and had become involved in civic affairs including serving on the city council.

In 1920 Joseph sold out and bought a large farm near Stella, Washington. The town had attracted a sizable contingent of Eastern European immigrants and many of Joseph's relatives were soon to follow.

Frank did come west, but did not settle in Washington. The 1920 census finds him in Deschutes County, Oregon working for the Bend Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Co. Camp #2 as a choker setter – a logger who attaches cables to logs for retrieval by skidders or skylines.

The Shelvin-Hixon Co. was well-known for two things – acquiring 215,000 acres of virgin Ponderosa along railroad lines through fraudulent homestead claims and then using the railroad to transport its portable camps. When the camp had clear cut all the available Ponderosa pine in an area, it would load the logging equipment onto flat cars and move them along with the bunkhouses – simple boxcars with a door and window – onto the next section of timber and park them on a spur line.

Frank was still in Deschutes County in 1926 when he registered a brand new 1926 Ford touring car with the state. He also registered this car in 1927, but whether or not he was employed by Shelvin-Hixon throughout all of those years is unknown.

When the 1930 census was taken Frank was a miner in Ruth, Nevada, a company town of 2,300 owned by the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company. He was boarding the with Perklacic family of seven.

By 1934 Frank moved to Virginia City, Nevada to work in the famous Comstock mine. According to newspaper obituaries, he served as a pall bearer for two of his fellow miners in 1934 and 1935.

In 1935, at the age of 37, he married Anna 'Ann' Theresa Kosovich in Salt Lake City. Ann was the 19-year-old daughter of immigrants. George Kosovich was born in Gospić, Lika, Croatia and Amanda 'Manda' Saban in Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia.

George and Manda were married in Salt Lake City right after Manda immigrated in 1913. They had six children – Mary, Anna, John, Teddie, Kathryn, and Louise. Mary was born in Colorado, and Ann in Lark, Salt Lake, Utah, but the rest of the children were born in Nevada.

Ann had grown up in Ruth, Nevada and attended the White Pine County High School in Ely through the 10th grade. She and Frank may have met in Ruth where he worked in the copper mine with her father. Or he may have been a boarder in her parent's home. They would take in as many as 10 miners at $45 a month each.

The first record of Ann and Frank as a couple was a newspaper notice in July 1937 about them and Ann's sisters, Mary and Kathryn, all of Virginia City, Nevada traveling to Salt Lake City to attend the funeral of their father who was just 43.

In December of 1939 Frank, who was employed at the mine of William Donovan in lower Gold Hill, had a close call when he fell in a chute and broke several ribs. He was taken to a hospital in Reno, but recovered in a little over a week.

When the census was taken on May 6, 1940, Ann and Frank were renting a home in Virginia City 'east of highway 17' for $15 a month. Frank was working in a gold and silver mine and Ann was waitressing. According to the census, both were putting in long hours. The census also reveals that Frank had completed schooling through the 8th grade and Ann through the 10th. Frank had not yet a become a naturalized citizen.

In June of 1941 they purchased their first home on the main thoroughfare of Virginia City at the corner of C. Street and Sutton Ave. The address is likely 110 North C. St. a small bungalow with a large porch and now the home of the Canvas Cafe.

Sometime prior to February 1944 Frank and Ann moved 130 miles east to the recently founded company town of Gabbs, Nevada. World War II had fueled the demand for magnesium and, in response, Basic Magnesium, Inc. expanded their production plant in the Gabbs Valley.

They sold their house in Virginia City in July of 1944 and Ann, still a young woman in her 20s, joined in the active social life of Gabbs which had a population of 426.

After the war the demand for magnesium dropped and the plant was closed. The last mention of the Sudars in Nevada is Ann's attendance at a bridal shower in late October of 1948. With the plant closed and his mining days behind him, Frank was undoubtedly in search of a new occupation.

Five years elapse before they again appear in a city directory. In 1953 they owned the B&M Grocery at 1740 E. Burnside and had their home at 1824 SE Pine, but they had probably arrived in Portland a few years earlier.

Frank and Ann had probably purchased the B&M store in 1949 because his widowed mother, Maria, appears in the 1950 directory as residing in one of the apartments above it. There are no records that show when Maria had immigrated to the U.S. or when she came to Portland. She died a couple of years later and was interred at Mount Calvary Cemetery in Portland.

Towards the end of the decade the B&M Grocery seems to have become a target for holdups, but Ann was undaunted. The Oregonian reported on January 1, 1959:

Lady Grocer Routes Pair

Thieves Panic at Soda Bottle

A 43-year-old woman grocer thought the gun appeared to be a toy, told her husband to call the police, and scared two would-be holdup men out of the B&M Grocery, 1740 E. Burnside St., Wednesday evening. It was Portland's third holdup in 24 hours.

Ann Sudar, co-owner of the store, told patrolmen Dayne Tune and John V. Hoffnagle the two men rushed into the store. One came to the cash register where she was and snapped. "This is a holdup, everyone, hand over what you have."

Mrs. Sudar said the gun he was pointing looked like a black toy model, so she ignored him and called to her husband, Frank, to call the police. The men turned and ran out of the store and Mrs. Sudar hit one in the leg with a bottle of soda pop.

On March 12, 1959, the Oregonian reported another attempted robbery at the store with similar results:

Woman Grocer Foils Robbers

A 43-year-old woman grocery operator foiled
attempts of holdup men for the second time in less than three months Wednesday night.

Ann Sudar, co-operator of the B&M Grocery, 1740 E. Burnside St. told two holdup men she would not give them money, and they became nervous and ran out of the store.

In 1963, after over a decade of ownership, they sold the B&M Grocery and purchased several properties in Kinzel Park from the Whiteheads. The purchase included 7934 SE Taylor and the Taylor Court Grocery. In 1964 they moved into their new home at 7917 SE Salmon.

From 1965-1967 the Taylor Court Grocery sponsored a little league team in the Mt. Tabor district. The team held their own against Belle's Burgers, Pasco's Panthers, and Goodat Crane.

Frank died in 1972 at the age of 74. He was survived by Ann, his sister Teraza Chenjanin in Yugoslavia, several nieces and nephews, and aunts in Longview, Washington. A requiem mass was held at Ascension Church on Mt. Tabor, and he was buried in Mt. Calvary Cemetery in Portland.

Ann remained in her home on Salmon and ran the Taylor Court Grocery for another 25 years. On March 1, 1996, at the age of 80, she sold her house at 1824 Pine St. A month later she sold 7934 SE Taylor and the Taylor Court Grocery to Mel Hafsos and Errol Carlson.

Seven years later she returned to Utah to live with her niece Paula Swanson. She died on her 72nd wedding anniversary on June 1, 2007 at that age of 91.

A requiem mass was held at the Ascension church on Mt. Tabor and she was buried in Mount Calvary Cemetery next to Frank.

Moon and Henry Hwang (1993-1996)

In 1993 Henry Hwang and his wife bought the store, but not the entire property from Ann. Henry was born He Nam Hwang on September 4, 1941 in Seung Hwan, Chunwan Kun Chung Nam, Korea. He petitioned to change his name to Henry Henam Hwang in 1971 when he became a naturalized citizen.

They had two children Jack Young Joon and Diane Y. Henry was naturalized in 1979, and Moon in 1980.

He and his wife ran the store for 2 ½ years and then sold to Error and Mel.

He died April 26, 2006 in Washington County, Oregon.

Mount Tabor Map, 1891

This map shows the early subdivisions on the east side of Mt. Tabor. Kinzel Park, where Taylor Court Grocery has sat for almost 100 years, is shown in pink. Note how Kinzel Park and the Taborside subdivisions were skirted by the short-lived Mt. Tabor and Eastern Railway. Click the photo to enlarge.

Image courtesy of Vintage Portland, a project of City of Portland Archives and Records Center (PARC).

Map Guide

Each new subdivision had its own street naming and numbering convention which caused considerable confusion after these communities were annexed by Portland. The city made several attempts at address standardization, but it wasn't until 1931 that it settled on the quadrant system (NW, SW, NE, SE). The familiar white ceramic address tiles seen on many Portland homes were provided by the city during the renumbering. Here are some of the original street names for the Kinzel Park area along with their current designations.

Anderson St.  SE 82nd Ave.
Anderson St. (Corona Park)  SE Main St.
Base Line Rd.  SE Stark St.
Curtis St.  SE Yamhill St.
Delano St.  SE Taylor Court
Division Ave.  SE Market St.
Grand Ave.  SE 78th Ave.
Grand View St.  SE Madison St.
Hart Ave.  SE Clay St.
Kearney St.  SE Taylor St.
Kinzel St.  SE 76th Ave.
Lindstrom Ave.  SE Mill St.
LaVetta St.  SE Washington St.
Monroe Ave.  SE Hawthorne Blvd.
Mount Tabor Ave.  SE Stephens St.
Olive St.  SE Salmon St.
Peters St.  SE Taylor St.
Prospect St.  SE Main St.
Sheil St.  SE Madison St.
St. Louis St.  SE Salmon St.
Vine St.  SE Morrison St.
Wabash St.  SE Alder St.
Winters St.  SE 80th Ave.

Historic Footprint of the Store

The Sanborn Maps of Portland, which were originally created to estimate fire insurance risks, give a general footprint of the store in 1924 and 1950.

Sanborn Map Portland (1924-1928) 1924 Volume 9, Sheet 950

Sanborn Map Portland (1908-1950) 1950 Volume 9, Sheet 950

A side-by-side comparison of the lot in 1924 and 1950 shows how the building expanded over the years and includes the 1931 address number changes.

The three additions to the store were probably made by Carl and Emmy Anderson in 1933 because the store and barbershop first appear under separate addresses in the city directory in 1934.

Map Key

D – Dwelling, S – Store, A – Auto House or Private Garage

Dots or Xs represent the number of openings as you face the front of each building or addition. They are recorded on the left-hand side, rather than at the exact location of the opening. Stems (slashes) indicate the number of stories in the building.

Historic Permits

Abert's 1919 Home Bathroom Addition


Abert's 1922 Home Bathroom Redo



Anderson's 1927 and 1928 Store Plumbing



Carpenter's 1949 Store Heating Upgrades

Lindstrom & Feigenson Bridges

This is a partial list of the bridges, bridge approaches, and decks constructed by Oscar Lindstrom and William Feigenson. The firm was dissolved in 1936 after William’s death. Prior to Lindstrom & Feigenson, Oscar had a general construction firm, the Lindstrom Bros.

In 1933 the firm won the Class C. Annual Award of Merit 'Most Beautiful Steel Bridge' from the American Institute of Steel Construction for the Dr. John McLoughlin Memorial Bridge in Gladstone.

1918 Beaver Creek Bridge Columbia Co., Oregon
1919 Deschutes River Bridge Wasco Co., Oregon
1920 Big Eddy Overcrossing Wasco Co., Oregon
  Mosier Creek Bridge Wasco Co., Oregon
  Mill Creek Bridge The Dalles, Oregon
1921 Evans Park Bridge Douglas Co., Oregon
  Huntington Bridge Baker Co., Oregon
  Springfield Bridge Lane Co., Oregon
1922 Trout Creek Bridge Jefferson Co., Oregon
  Alexandra Avenue Bridge Portland, Oregon
  Myrtle Creek Bridge Douglas Co., Oregon
  Medford-Crater Lake Road Bridges  
1924 Ferrier Road Bridge Lewis Co., Washington
1925 Burnside Bridge (Approach) Portland, Oregon
1926 Ross Island Bridge (Approach) Portland, Oregon
1928 Soapstone Creek Bridge Clatsop Co., Oregon
  Klineline Bridge Clark Co., Oregon
  Lovejoy Viaduct Portland, Oregon
  Broadway Bridge (Approach) Portland, Oregon
  McKenzie Highway Bridge Springfield, Oregon
1929 Interstate Bridge (Approach/Deck) Oregon and Washington
  NE 33rd Ave Viaduct Portland, Oregon
  Lewis and Clark Bridge Longview, Washington
1931 Link River Bridge Klamath Falls, Oregon
  Hawthorne Bridge (New Approach) Portland, Oregon
  St. John's Bridge (Approach/Deck) Portland, Oregon
1932 Mary's River Bridge Corvallis, Oregon
1933 John McLoughlin Memorial Bridge Gladstone, Oregon
1936 Alsea Bay Bridge Waldport, Oregon


Sources

Selling of Lot 1

1880 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1083; Family History Film: 1255083; Page: 402C; Enumeration District: 140; Image 0388.

1880 U. S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place: Mount Tabor, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1082; Family History Film: 1255082; Page: 190A; Enumeration District: 090; Image: 0719.

1900 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Portland Ward 5, Multnomah, Oregon; roll: 1350; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0055; FHL microfilm:1241350.

A Game of Freeze Out” Oregonian, 18 Sep 1894, p. 8.

Howard gets $50 Verdict” Oregonian, 7 Dec 1894, p. 10.

Obituaries: Martha Burdick” Oregonian, 9 May 1915, Section 19, p. 3.

Real Estate Transfers” The Oregon Daily Journal, 27 Oct 1902: p. 7.

Sales Of Real Estate. List of Deeds Filed for Record In the Recorder's Office-Summary” Oregonian, 26 Jul 1892: p. 5.

Sheriffs Sale:Report of Delinquent Taxpayers” Oregonian, 19 Nov 1900: p. 12.

Theft Of A Railroad Serious Charges In A Suit Filed In The Circuit Court” Oregonian, 31 Oct 1894: p. 8.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Burdicks

1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Year: 1860; Census Place: Lecompton, Douglas, Kansas Territory; Roll: M653_349; Page: 172; Image: 172; Family History Library Film: 803349

1880 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations inc. 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place: Oakland, Cloud, Kansas; Roll: 377; Family History Film: 1254377; Page: 282B; Enumeration District: 045; Image: 0107

1880 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations inc. 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place: Silverton, Marion, Oregon; Roll: 1082; Family History Film: 1255082; Page: 122D; Enumeration District: 085; Image: 0585

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Montavilla, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1351; Page: 31B; Enumeration District: 0088; FHL microfilm: 1241351

1910 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Year: 1900; Census Place: Portland Ward 9, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1350; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 0074; FHL microfilm: 1241350

1910 U.S. Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Year: 1910; Census Place
: Portland Ward 8, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T624_1287; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 0201; FHL microfilm: 1375300.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: South Kelly Butte, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T625_1503; Page: 11B; Enumeration District: 195; Image: 827

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: 2500; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0158; Image: 8.0; FHL microfilm: 2342234

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1949; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0035; Image: 491.0; FHL microfilm: 2341683

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T627_4376; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 40-97A

Beach Population Grows as Summer Season Advances” Oregonian, 2 Jul 1916, Section 3, p. 12.

Beach Resorts Attract Many Vacationists for the Holiday Season” Oregonian, 16 Aug 1925, p. 43.

Blue Bloods of Dog Dom on Show Bow-Wows of All Kinds Are Competing for Kennel Club Honors” Oregonian, 27 Apr 1911, p.10.

Call of the Great Out-of-Doors is Heard by Many” Oregonian, 6 Aug 1916, Section 3, p. 11.

Cottages Being Closed as Season's Visitors Return to Town” September 5, 1915 Paper: Oregonian, 4 Sep 1915, Section: 4, p. 5.

Death of Prominent Teacher” Oregonian, 20 Nov 1899: p. 3.

Dogs Meet Their Friends at Show Given for ThemThe Oregon Daily Journal, 28 Apr 1910, p. 17.

Farley-Burdick Wedding” Oregon Daily Journal, 13 Jun 1902, p. 3.

“His Wife Made Trouble: Ice Cream Manufacturer Sued by Relatives” The Morning Oregonian, 31 Dec 1902, p. 14.

In the Realm Feminine: The Child Welfare Exhibit” Oregon Daily Journal, 11 Nov 1911, p. 10.

Iowa, Select Marriages Index, 1758-1996 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. 1885 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: KS1885_113; Line: 8

Local Inventor Scores” The Oregon Daily Journal, 19 Apr 1910.

Multnomah County, Oregon Marriage Index, 1855-1911 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Manhattan Beach” The Oregon Daily Journal, 25 Jul 1915, p. 45.

North Lincoln County Beaches Red Head Roundup” Corvallis Gazette-Times, 30 Jun 1939, p. 9.

Obituaries: Frederick Edward Burdick” The Seattle Times, 30 Apr 1947: p. 20.

Obituaries: Rose Burdick” Oregonian, 9 Aug 1943: p. 8.

Oregon, Wills and Probate Records, 1849-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Real Estate Transfers” The Morning Oregonian, 12 Mar 1903: p. 11.

Sheriff's Sale: Delinquent Taxes” Oregonian, 17 Jul 1894: p. 9.

Student at U. W. 75 Years Old Dies: Mrs. Flora Wood McKinney Passes Away at Home of Daughter in Portland” Seattle Daily Times, 7 Mar 1919: p. 3.

Tearing Up the Railroad” Oregonian, 24 Sep 1895: p. 5.

U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1700s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Washington, Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Aberts

“$1,500 Cottage Started” The Oregonian, 7 Feb. 1915: p. 4:8.

1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Year: 1870; Census Place: Carrolton, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: M593_701; Page: 83A; Image: 170; Family History Library Film: 552200.

1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place: Alpena, Alpena, Michigan; Roll: 570; Family History Film: 1254570; Page: 510C; Enumeration District: 009; Image: 0142.

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Year: 1900; Census Place: Buena Vista, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: 739; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 0028; FHL microfilm: 1240739.

1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Portland Ward 8, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T624_1287; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 0201; FHL microfilm: 1375300.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T625_1501; Page: 12B; Enumeration District: 91; Image: 150.

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1955; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 0231; Image: 246.0; FHL microfilm: 2341689.

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Kelly, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T627_3376; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 26-15.

“Building Permits” The Oregon Daily Journal, 17 Jun 1918: p. 10.

“Building Permits” The Oregon Daily Journal, 26 Jul 1918: p. 14.

“Building Permits” The Oregon Daily Journal, 2 Dec 1919: p. 18.

“Died” The Oregonian, 9 Mar 1937: p. 13.

“For Sale – Livestock” The Oregon Daily Journal, 24 Sep 1908: p. 19.

“Guild Pin Badge of Craft Ability” The Oregonian, 27 Jan 1924: p. 10.

Historic Permits. City of Portland, Oregon. Portlandmaps.com.

“Hit-Run Motorist Kills Woman, 63" The Oregonian, 9 Mar 1947: p. 1.

“Landscape Gardeners” The Oregon Daily Journal, 24 Apr 1921: p. 37.

Minnesota, Territorial and State Censuses, 1849-1905 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.

“Montavilla Making Rapid Growth” The Oregonian, 14 Nov 1909: p. 4:11.

Obituaries” The Oregonian, 15 Jan 1922: p. 2:7.

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Marriage Indexes, 1906-1924, 1946-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Motor Vehicle Registrations, 1911-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

“Real Estate Transfers” The Oregon Daily Journal, 23 Jul 1910: p. 11.

“Real Estate Transfers” The Oregon Daily Journal, 2 Oct 1911: p. 14.

“Real Estate Transfers” The Oregon Daily Journal, 25 Apr 1918: p. 14.

“Real Estate Transfers” The Oregon Daily Journal, 14 Jun 1918: p. 14.

Soden, Khris, comp. 1931 Portland Street Renaming Directory. PastPortland.com.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Washington, County Marriages, 1855-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Andersons

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1952; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0343; Image: 502.0; FHL microfilm: 2341686

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T627_3390; Page: 61A; Enumeration District: 37-293.

“Advertisement” Oregonian, 18 May 1935: p. 5.

Bror O. Edfelt” Port Angeles Evening News, 19 Sep 1968: p. 18.

Female Help Wanted” Seattle Daily Times, 7 Jan 1917: p. 21.

Gothenburg, Sweden, Passenger Lists, 1869-1951 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Holand, Mel N., The Story of Anacortes Veneer: A Worker-Owned Enterprise, 1964, TS. Collection of the Anacortes Museum.

Obituaries: Emmy M. Anderson” Skagit Valley Herald, 3 Apr 1992.

Oregon, Motor Vehicle Registrations, 1911-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Personals” Port Angeles Evening News, 20 Jul 1956: p. 7.

Personals” Port Angeles Evening News, 31 Dec 1959: p. 7.

Rix-Gellor Wedding in Church” Port Angeles Evening News, 26 Feb 1970: p. 6.

Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

Sweden, Emigrants Registered in Church Books, 1783-1991 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.

Sweden, Indexed Birth Records, 1860-1941 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1700s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

U.S., Naturalization Records, 1840-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Washington Death Index, 1940-1996 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Shulls

1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Year: 1880; Census Place: Eagle Creek, Clackamas, Oregon; Roll: 1080; Family History Film: 1255080; Page: 176D; Enumeration District: 015; Image: 0350.

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Johnston, Whitman, Washington; Roll: 1753; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 0093; FHL microfilm: 1241753.

1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Grass Valley, Sherman, Oregon; Roll: T624_1289; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0249; FHL microfilm: 1375302.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Year: 1920; Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T625_1500; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 84; Image: 996.

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Chenowith, Skamania, Washington; Roll: 2508; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0003; Image: 1089.0; FHL microfilm: 2342242.

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Monkland, Sherman, Oregon; Roll: T627_3379; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 28-4.

Historic Permits. City of Portland, Oregon. Portlandmaps.com.

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

“Pair Married for 50 Years” The Oregonian, 19 Oct 1947: p. 16.

“Sixty-Year Fete Due Sunday: Moves Credited for Happy Life” The Oregonian, 14 Oct 1956: p. 43.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Washington State and Territorial Censuses, 1857-1892 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Carpenters

1911 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1911; Census Place: 3 - Bastard and Burgess South Township, Delta Village, Leeds, Ontario; Page: 13; Family No: 166.

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Jackson, Jackson, Indiana; Roll: 378; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 0073; FHL microfilm: 1240378.

1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 12, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T624_369; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0213; FHL microfilm: 1374382.

1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 13, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T624_369; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0231; FHL microfilm: 1374382.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 13, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T625_455; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 238; Image: 748.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Denver, Denver, Colorado; Roll: T625_160; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 166; Image: 1095.

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 15, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T625_456; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 264; Image: 358.

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Maywood, Los Angeles, California; Roll: 172; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 1339; Image: 43.0; FHL microfilm: 2339907.

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: San Antonio, Los Angeles, California; Roll: 172; Page: 35B; Enumeration District: 1378; Image: 917.0; FHL microfilm: 2339907.

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: San Antonio, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T627_245; Page: 67B; Enumeration District: 19-553.

"California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," index and images,FamilySearch, William Carpenter and Florance Schofield, 22 Oct 1928; citing p. 256, Orange, California, United States; FHL microfilm 2051016.

"California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," index and images, FamilySearch William Albert Carpenter and Florence Phyllis Schofield, 12 Jun 1929; citing p. 226, Los Angeles, California, United States; FHL microfilm 2074760.

"California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," index and images, FamilySearch, Willard Roscoe Rose and J Margueritte St Claire, 21 Jan 1928; citing p. 186, Los Angeles, California, United States; FHL microfilm 2074711.

"California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," index and images, FamilySearch, John Kenny Dodgson and Jerre Marguerite St Clair, 24 Sep 1934; citing p. 114, Los Angeles, California, United States; FHL microfilm 2113655.

Cook County, Illinois Marriage Indexes, 1912-1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Indiana, Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Indiana, Select Marriages, 1780-1992 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2014.

Obituaries: Florence Carpenter” The Oregonian, 2 Jan 1954: p. 7.

Obituaries: William Carpenter” The Oregonian, 6 Jan 1969: p. 21.

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866-1938 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Whiteheads

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Civil District 3, Carter, Tennessee; Roll: 1560; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 0128; FHL microfilm: 1241560

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Meadow, Clay, Iowa; Roll: 424; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0030; FHL microfilm: 1240424

1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Civil District 3, Carter, Tennessee; Roll: T624_1492; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0003; FHL microfilm: 1375505

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Barton, Clackamas, Oregon; Roll: T625_1491; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 933

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Knife Lake, Kanabec, Minnesota; Roll: T625_840; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 45; Image: 349

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Bridal Veil, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: 1955; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 0251; Image: 532.0; FHL microfilm: 2341689

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Hood River, Hood River, Oregon; Roll: T627_3361; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 14-10

Births” The Oregonian, 19 Feb 1947: p. 20.

Burglar Thwarted” The Oregonian, 2 Oct 1956: p. 13.

California, County Marriages, 1850-1952, database with images, FamilySearch.org.

Iowa, Marriage Records, 1880-1937 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Multnomah County Deed Records, Deed Book 2186, Page 181, Recorder's Office 501 SE Hawthorne Blvd. Portland, OR 97214.

Muster rolls of U.S. Navy ships, stations, and other naval activities, 1939-1949, Fold3.com.

New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Year: 1901; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 0170; Line: 26; Page Number: 112

“Obituaries: Gus E. Whitehead” The Oregonian, 31 Mar 1964: p. 26.

Obituaries: Lorena Pedersen Whitehead” The Oregonian, 12 Jan 1997.

People and Products” The Oregonian, 24 Dec 1977: p. 19.

Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.

Thieves Visit Grocery” The Oregonian, 30 Sep 1956: p. 44.

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Marriage Indexes, 1906-1924, 1946-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Motor Vehicle Registrations, 1911-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 1 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

West Virginia, Births Index, 1804-1938 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.


Sudars

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.Year: 1920; Census Place: West Side, Deschutes, Oregon; Roll: T625_1493; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 38; Image: 485

1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Ruth, White Pine, Nevada; Roll: T625_1005; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 66; Image: 981

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Ruth, White Pine, Nevada; Roll: 1297; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 0016; Image: 407.0; FHL microfilm: 2341032

1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Ruth, White Pine, Nevada; Roll: 1297; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0016; Image: 424.0; FHL microfilm: 2341032

1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Virginia City, Storey, Nevada; Roll: T627_2280; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 15-2

Gregory, Ronald L. Life in Railroad Logging Camps of the Shevlin-Hixon Company. Corvallis: OSU Anthropology Department, 2001.

Lady Grocer Routes Pair” The Oregonian, 1 Jan 1959: p. 17.

Montana, History and Biography [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

Multnomah County Deed Records, Recorder's Office 501 SE Hawthorne Blvd. Portland, OR 97214.

Multnomah County Property Records, [database on-line] Multcoproptax.com.

New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Obituaries: Frank Sudar” The Oregonian, 12 Feb 1972: p. 52.

Obituaries: Maria Sudar” The Oregonian, 9 Dec 1952: p. 29.

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Motor Vehicle Registrations, 1911-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Stout, Tom, ed.. Montana, Its Story and Biography; A History of Aboriginal and Territorial Montana and Three Decades of Statehood. Vol. I-III. Chicago and New York, USA: The American Historical Society, 1921, p. 390-91.

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

U.S. Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1940, database, FamilySearch.org.

Utah, Select Marriage Index, 1887-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Virginia City News” Nevada State Journal, 11 Jul 1937: p. 3.

Woman Grocer Foils Robbers” The Oregonian, 12 Mar 1959: p. 34.

Hwangs

Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Oregon, Naturalization Records 1865-1991 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 1 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U. S. Public Records 1970-2010 [database on-line]. MyHeritage.com, 2010.

U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.